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Politics & Polls #156: Black Youth and the Criminal Justice System Ft. Carl Suddler
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October 10, 2019 09:00 AM PDT
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Racism affects our criminal justice system — from policing methods to prison-system structures to punishments issued for different crimes. More than 50 years after the publication of the Kerner Report — which investigated the 1967 race riots — many of the same problems of institutionalized racism persist today.

Carl Suddler joins Julian Zelizer in this episode to discuss the racialized nature of the criminal justice system, which is the topic of his new book, “Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York.” The book examines history of policies and strategies that led to the criminalization of black youth, including stop-and-frisk policing and no-knock warrants, and media coverage of black youth and crime.

Suddler is an assistant professor in the Department of History at Emory University. Prior to joining to Emory faculty this year, Suddler was an assistant professor of African American history at Florida Atlantic University and a postdoctoral fellow at the James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference at Emory. His research focuses on the intersections of youth, race, and crime and on the consequences of inequity in the United States. Suddler is also a contributing writer for the Conversation and Bleacher Report and has published work in the Journal of American History, Journal of African American History, American Studies Journal, and The Washington Post.

#155: The Evolution of Free Enterprise Ft. Lawrence Glickman
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October 03, 2019 07:32 AM PDT
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Many conservative politicians have used the term “free enterprise” as a rallying cry during the past few elections. Yet, the exact meaning of the phrase is unclear. Where did this idea come from? What did it mean in different time periods? And what are the stakes in how we define it?

Lawrence Glickman joins Julian Zelizer in this episode to discuss these questions, which he addresses in his new book, “Free Enterprise: An American History.” The book examines how the idea of free enterprise has changed over the past few decades, covering its origins in 1832, its growth as an oppositional ideology to the New Deal, and its role in American politics now.

Glickman is the Stephen and Evalyn Professor of American Studies at Cornell University. He has authored four books, including “Buying Power: A History of Consumer Activism in America.” Prior to joining the Cornell faculty in 2014, Glickman was the Carolina Trustee Professor and chair of the Department of History at the University of South Carolina. He has written on public affairs for Boston Review, Dissent, and other publications.

#154: The Press Under Attack Ft. Jim Acosta
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September 26, 2019 08:09 AM PDT
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The media has come under increasing attack over the past few years. While the adversarial relationship between past presidents and the media is not new, some have argued that President Trump has gone further than his predecessors by targeting specific journalists and using language meant to incite violence. As accusations of “fake news” grow, many are paying close attention to how media outlets cover the current administration.

Jim Acosta of CNN joins Julian Zelizer in this episode to discuss his experiences covering the Trump administration’s first two years in office. His new book, “The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America” examines the recent attacks and death threats against Acosta and other members of the press corps, the roles of former Press Secretaries Sean Spicer and Sarah Huckabee Sanders, and media coverage of the 2020 presidential election. Acosta gave a public talk at Princeton on Sept. 23.

Acosta is CNN’s chief White House correspondent, currently covering the Trump administration and previously covering the Obama administration. He has received several awards, including the National Association of Hispanic Journalists 2017 Presidential Award and the San Jose State University Journalism School 2018 William Randolph Hearst Foundation Award, and was a part of the CNN team that won an Emmy for their 2012 presidential campaign coverage. Prior to joining CNN in 2007, Acosta reported as a news correspondent for CBS News, CBS Newspath, and various local radio stations.

#154: The Press Under Attack Ft. Jim Acosta
Clean
September 26, 2019 08:09 AM PDT
itunes pic

The media has come under increasing attack over the past few years. While the adversarial relationship between past presidents and the media is not new, some have argued that President Trump has gone further than his predecessors by targeting specific journalists and using language meant to incite violence. As accusations of “fake news” grow, many are paying close attention to how media outlets cover the current administration.

Jim Acosta of CNN joins Julian Zelizer in this episode to discuss his experiences covering the Trump administration’s first two years in office. His new book, “The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America” examines the recent attacks and death threats against Acosta and other members of the press corps, the roles of former Press Secretaries Sean Spicer and Sarah Huckabee Sanders, and media coverage of the 2020 presidential election. Acosta gave a public talk at Princeton on Sept. 23.

Acosta is CNN’s chief White House correspondent, currently covering the Trump administration and previously covering the Obama administration. He has received several awards, including the National Association of Hispanic Journalists 2017 Presidential Award and the San Jose State University Journalism School 2018 William Randolph Hearst Foundation Award, and was a part of the CNN team that won an Emmy for their 2012 presidential campaign coverage. Prior to joining CNN in 2007, Acosta reported as a news correspondent for CBS News, CBS Newspath, and various local radio stations.

#153: The Odds of Elizabeth Warren Versus Donald Trump in 2020
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September 19, 2019 09:43 AM PDT
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The Democratic field has started to narrow. Of the 26 candidates who announced their bid for the presidency, 20 remain as of mid-September. And at the third Democratic presidential debate last week, only 10 qualified, giving voters a closer look at the candidates’ policy positions.

Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang discuss possible reasons behind Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s steady rise in the polls and the cases in favor and against President Donald Trump’s reelection, as well as the role of voter ID laws, vote suppression, and redistricting in the next election.

#152: The ‘Attention Economy’ Ft. James Williams
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September 12, 2019 08:19 AM PDT
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Digital technology is playing an increasingly large role in our lives. We use our smartphones to communicate, post photos, read breaking news, watch videos, and more — to the point where we touch our phones an average of 2,600 times a day, according to a study by research firm Dscout.

Author James Williams joins Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang in this episode to discuss his new book, “Stand Out of Our Light: Freedom and Resistance in the Attention Economy.” The book examines the attention economy and how this relentless competition for attention from our digital products and services is undermining individual human will and democracy at large.

The book was chosen by Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber ’83 as the pre-read selection for the Class of 2023. Williams joined Eisgruber and other faculty (including Wang) at a Sept. 9 book talk.

The recipient of the inaugural Cambridge University “Nine Dots Prize” for original thinking in 2017, Williams recently completed his doctoral work in philosophy at Oxford University. Before that, he worked for Google as a technology and business strategist. He also is a co-founder of the Time Well Spent campaign, a project that aims to steer technology design toward having greater respect for users’ attention, goals, and values. His writing about the philosophy and ethics of technology has been published in The Observer, WIRED, and other publications.

#151: Digital Media and Politics Ft. David Kapf
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September 05, 2019 12:05 PM PDT
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Political discussions — and subsequent controversies — unfold by the minute on platforms like Twitter. In this episode, Julian Zelizer speaks with David Karpf about viral moments and their ramifications.

Karpf is an associate professor in the School of Media and Public Affairs at the George Washington University. His work focuses on strategic communication practices of political associations in the United States, with a particular interest in internet-related strategies.

He is the author of "The MoveOn Effect: The Unexpected Transformation of American Political Advocacy" and "Analytic Activism: Digital Listening and the New Political Strategy." Both books discuss how digital media is transforming the work of political advocacy and activist organizations. His writing about digital media and politics has been published in a wide range of academic and journalistic outlets, including The Nation, Nonprofit Quarterly, and The Chronicle of Higher Education.

#150: Election Reform with Lawrence Lessig
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August 15, 2019 09:33 AM PDT
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Voter suppression, gerrymandering, money in politics, and even issues with the electoral college all call into question whether the United States truly has a representative democracy. How might these issues play a role in the upcoming 2020 elections?

Renowned scholar Lawrence Lessig of Harvard Law School joins Sam Wang on today’s program for a discussion on election reform.

Lessig is the is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership. Prior to rejoining the Harvard faculty, he was a professor at Stanford Law School, where he founded the school’s Center for Internet and Society, and a professor at the University of Chicago. He clerked for Judge Richard Posner on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Antonin Scalia on the United States Supreme Court. Author of numerous books, he’s also received many awards, including the Free Software Foundation’s Freedom Award, Fastcase 50 Award and was named one of Scientific American’s Top 50 Visionaries.

#149: How Our Genes Shape Societies Ft. Nicholas Christakis
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August 08, 2019 11:27 AM PDT
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History is rife with examples of people behaving badly, sometimes with truly evil intent. Yet noted scholar Nicholas Christakis argues that humans are actually wired for goodness. His recent book, “Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society,” makes the case for what he calls a “social blueprint for goodness,” which he discusses with Sam Wang and Julian Zelizer in this episode.

A physician and sociologist, Christakis directs the Human Nature Lab at Yale University and is the Sterling Professor of Social and Natural Science in the Departments of Sociology, Medicine, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Statistics and Data Science, and Biomedical Engineering. Nicholas was named one of Time magazine’s “100 Most Influential People in the World” and one of Foreign Policy magazine’s “Top 100 Global Thinkers.”

#148: The Power of Silicon Valley Ft. Margaret O’Mara
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August 01, 2019 07:55 AM PDT
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Silicon Valley has emerged as the epicenter of technological innovation within the American economy. Yet, people often know little about the region’s origins and how it grew to become an influential force behind new innovations in society.

Margaret O’Mara joins Julian Zelizer to discuss her new book, “The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America,” which addresses the history behind the development of Silicon Valley.

O’Mara is the Howard & Frances Keller Professor of History at the University of Washington. Her previous books include “Cities of Knowledge: Cold War Science and the Search for the Next Silicon Valley” and “Pivotal Tuesdays: Four Elections That Shaped the Twentieth Century.” Before becoming a professor, O’Mara was a contributing researcher at the Brookings Institution in the Clinton White House.

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